GUIDELINES FOR SAVING A TROUBLED MARRIAGE

GUIDELINES FOR SAVING A TROUBLED MARRIAGE

GUIDELINES FOR SAVING A TROUBLED MARRIAGE

Ideally, couples will always have the opportunity to learn the principles of building a strong relationship before they are married. Statistics show us that this is very often not the case. In fact, few couples have the knowledge of what it takes to make a marriage really work.

As they confront the stress of daily living and the difficult challenges of their relationship, they begin to lose the desire to fight for their marriage or simply begin taking their relationship for granted. They allow small problems to grow into great sources of contention and fail to look for solutions when they discuss their problems.

Nagging, name-calling and neglect lead to resentment, bitterness, and even infidelity. Sooner than later, couples who never imagined they could have serious trouble down the road, become one of the growing numbers of failed marriages in today’s society. As they face serious problems in their marriage, they often receive little encouragement from others to stay married. Modern divorce law makes it easier than ever to dissolve a marriage and often fails to protect the sacredness of the commitment that was made.

If you are reading this e-book because your marriage is already traveling in this direction, here are some ways you can fight to keep your marriage alive. Although it takes commitment from both sides to make a marriage work, there are some things you can do that may convince your spouse that there still hope for your relationship. At the very least, you will have done your very best to save a marriage and will be closer to removing the animosity between you.

BEFORE YOU APPROACH YOUR SPOUSE ABOUT SAVING YOUR RELATIONSHIP. . .

•Take some time for reflection. Rest physically, and refresh yourself emotionally and spiritually. Evaluate your situation and try to put things in perspective.
Think about the long-term value of working through the present difficulties.

•Be honest with yourself about what you must be willing to change to make your relationship work. If you are not willing to make adjustments in the way you are relating to your spouse or change in areas that are affecting your relationship, you can’t expect your spouse to be willing to do so.

•Be objective and realistic. Don’t blame your spouse for the entire problem, and don’t blame yourself for what is not truly your fault. Each of you must be willing to recognize his or her part of the problem.

•Write down what you think you have both done right in your marriage and the good things that have come from your relationships. Next, write down the lessons you have learned from your mistakes. Finally, write down what you believe is at the root of your problems and a list of the problems you need to solv

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